Find Practice Questions and Videos Below by Topic

Find detailed exam style questions, videos and more by topic below:

Physical Chemistry
Inorganic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry

Physical Chemistry

This section is testing your knowledge of atomic structure, so all things protons, neutrons and electrons.
What exam boards are looking for from this section is a grasp of the relative
weights, charges and position of these particles within an atom and understanding
of isotopes and reason why they show near identical reactivity.

Download Questions Here:

Physical – Atomic Structure – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Physical – Atomic Structure – Answers

Physical – Atom structure – Explanations

 

All things mole relating to both solids, liquids and gases. Similar to what you would have seen at GCSE however at A-level we take the quantification further and see some more equations for gases in particular.

Download Questions Here:

Physical – Amount of substance – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Physical – Amount of Substance – Answers

Physical – Amount of Substance – Explanations

This topic stretches (no pun intended) from the strongest covalent bonds to the weakest of dipole-dipole interactions. The outcome here is to be able to predict types of bonding between two atoms or ions based on their electronic properties. From this we can see how compounds are held together and think of ways to manipulate their use.

Download Questions Here:

Physical – Bonding – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Physical – Bonding – Answers

Physical – Bonding – Explanations

 

 

A study of chemical changes due to energy, in this section we are most concerned with heat energy and the relationships and results we can obtain from considering enthalpy changes.

Download Questions Here:

Physical – Energetics – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Physical – Energetics – Answers

 

Physical – Energetics – Explanations

How fast? That’s what kinetics is all about. It’s understanding how fast a reaction is and what factors effect this. By understanding this we can manipulate reaction conditions to optimise reaction rates.

Download Questions Here:

Physical – Kinetics – Questions 

Download answers and explanations here:

Physical – Kinetics – Answers

Physical – Kinetics – Explanations

You’re probably familiar with this: ⇌ and think of equilibria. This segment looks to ways of manipulating the balance either side of this symbol. It’s extremely useful especially if a useful product is on the right-hand side of the equation.

Download Questions Here:

Physical – Equilibria – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Physical – Equilirium Constant – Answers

 

Whereas the kinetics section was all about how fast, thermodynamics is about how stable compounds are. The stability of a product is important for determining if it’s a viable reaction or not. In this section you’ll be introduced to some familiar and new terms to describe these stabilities.

Download Questions Here:

Physical – Thermodynamics – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Physical – Thermodynamics – Answers

Linking to the work done in the kinetics and rate topics covered, we put some more definitions to reactions and add more quantitative methods. Orders of reaction, rate equations and the Arrehenius equation all found here.

Download Questions Here:

Physical – Rate Equations – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Physical – Rate Equations – Answers

Physical – Rate Equations – Explanations

Think pH and buffers and the important uses of acids and bases, not just in the laboratory environment but everyday life too.

Download Questions Here:

Physical – Acid and Bases – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Physical – Acid and Bases – Answers

This section is all about redox reactions and there characteristics, as well as the useful applications we have for them in everyday life. The ‘potential difference’ is the basis of how an electrical system can provide work.

Download Questions Here: 

Physical – Electrochemistry – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Physical – Electrode Potientials and Electrochemical Cells – Answers

Inorganic Chemistry

This topic looks at what we can learn from an element’s position within its period. It looks at patterns of physical properties like melting points, and chemical properties like solubilities and reactivities of both the elements and their compounds.

Download Questions Here:

Inorganic – Periodicty – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Inorganic – Periodicity – Answers

Inorganic  – Periodicity – Explanations

Group 2 of the periodic table contains the alkaline earth metals. When we learn about the chemical properties of the group 2 compounds like the sulphates and hydroxides, this can enable us to clearly understand their use.

Download Questions Here:

Inorganic – Group 2 – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Inorganic – Group 2 – Answers

Inorganic – Group 2 – Explanations

This topic looks at the halogens, mainly focusing on fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and iodine. Their relative oxidising and reducing abilities can tell us a lot about their structures on an atomic scale. The topic finishes by looking at the uses of chlorine.

Download Questions Here: 

Inorganic – Group 7 – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Inorganic – Group 7 – Answers

Inorganic  – Group 7 – Explanations

The patterns across period 3 can, when learnt and understood, tell us a lot about the elements and compounds within it. This topic links intimately to many aspects of various physical chemistry topics, such as bonding.

Download Questions Here:

Inorganic – Period 3 – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Inorganic – Period 3 – Answers

Inorganic – Period 3 Explanations

The properties of the transition metals are studied in depth across this topic, and you will be required to draw on knowledge from right across the course in order to fully understand all of the content. From the formation of coloured ions to their use in catalysis, the transition metals topic is broad, but often very interesting.

Download Questions Here: 

Inorganic – Transition metals – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Inorganic – Transition metals – Answers

Inorganic – Transition Metals – explanations

This short topic covers the ways that certain transition metal complexes can react when in solution, and explores why certain reactions occur or are preferred.

Download Questions Here:

Inorganic -Reactions of ions in aqueous solutions – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Inorganic – Reactions of ions in aqueous solutions – Answers

Inorganic – Reactions of ions in aqueous solutions – Explanations

Organic Chemistry

Saturated hydrocarbons made of covalent bonds with a general formula of CnH2n+2, alkanes are seen in two main types linear and branched. A third type is often quoted as cyclic, but due to the difference in general formula these are strictly cycloalkanes. The main source of alkanes is crude oil and natural gases, and the processing and use of these resources creates a economical and environmental dispute of which the understanding of the chemistry of alkanes highlights.

Download Questions Here:

Organic – Alkanes – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Organic – Alkanes – Explanations

Organic – Alkanes – Answers

 

A group derived from alkanes containing one or more halogens, which is very susceptible to
nucleophilic attack and therefore significantly more reactive than alkanes. They have many
applications such as in fire extinguishers, refrigerators and solvents. The use of haloalkanes has been
heavily restricted in recent years though due to their role in ozone depletion.

Organic – Haloalkanes – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Organic – Haloalkanes – Explanations

Organic – Haloalkanes – Answers

Unsaturated hydrocarbons containing a carbon, carbon double bond. They are more reactive than alkanes, as seen by the different addition reactions demonstrating there electrophilic nature. Alkenes also allow us to introduce the pi bond and see how it effects the reactivity and stereochemistry of hydrocarbons as well as the formation of addition polymers.

Download Questions Here:

Organic – Alkenes – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Organic – Alkenes – Explanations

Organic – Alkenes – Answers

Most people consider Alcohol a drug, which is ingested into the body as an alcoholic drink. Chemists consider it as a group of organic compounds which contain at least one OH functional group attached to an alkyl group. The polar nature of alcohols means that they are readily utilized in many synthetic techniques, a few of which are touched on in this course. Alcohols are also seen throughout nature, in particular ethanol which is currently blended with gasoline as an early attempt to start fuelling our transport systems with renewable sources.

Download Questions Here:

Organic – Alcohols – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Organic – Alcohols – Explanations

Organic – Alcohols – Answers

Arguably the hardest topic in the organic course, this requires you to call on all of the different
reactions seen in the course and suggest a possible route for the synthesis of a target material. This
section gives a good taster of what organic chemists do when they are given a target material to
produce.

Download Questions Here:

Organic – Sythetic Routes – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Organic – Organic Synthesis – Explanations

Organic – Organic Synthesis – Answers

The naming of organic compounds and the understanding of the definitions in this section
are absolutely fundamental to your success in your chemistry A-level. The naming of compounds
follows a clear set of rules governed by IUPAC, which by the end of the course you should be
proficient in applying. The concept of isomerism is also introduced in this section, but will be taken
further in following sections.

Download Questions Here:

Organic – Nomenclature – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Organic – Nomenclature – Explanations

Organic – Nomenclature – Answers

This is where we are first introduced to the carbonyl group (C=O). This functional group is seen
throughout organic chemistry and is very prevalent in pharmaceuticals and natural products. It is
seen in many different derivatives, the simplest being in aldehydes RCHO and ketones R2CO. At Alevel
we also see it in amides, acyl chlorides, carboxylic acids, esters and acid anhydrides. As seen in
previous sections the difference in electronegativity of C and O, leads to carbonyls being susceptible
to nucleophilic attack. The understanding of the polarisation of this bond is fundamental to this
section.

Download Questions Here: 

Organic – Aldehydes – Ketones – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Organic – Aldehydes and ketones – Explanations

Organic – Aldehydes and Ketones – Answers

Carboxylic acids RCOOH, esters RCOOR’, acyl chlorides RCOCl can all be readily converted between
each other. This section demonstrates many different synthetic steps which will become vital, when
planning a full synthetic route. It also applies some key concepts from earlier in course to new
functional groups, and finally looking at the applications and uses of carboxylic acids and esters.

Download Questions Here:

Organic – Carboxylic acids, esters and acyl chlorides – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Organic – Carboxylic acids, esters and acyl chlorides – Explanations

Organic – Carboxylic acids, esters and acyl chlorides – Answers

At A-level we look at benzene and its substituted derivatives, mainly focusing on the nature of its bonding and a fixed set of reactions. Arenes/Aromatic hydrocarbons encompasses many other molecules, but you need only worry about benzene for your a-level. It is also important to understand the dangers of benzene which is a known carcinogen, as it had previously been readily used in schools.

Download Questions Here:

Organic – Arenes – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Organic – Arenes – Explanations

Organic – Arenes – Answers

A huge number of pharmaceutical compounds contain nitrogen, to the extent that it is the
most common heteroatom (any atom other than H or C) found in pharmaceutical compounds.
Therefore, it is vital to get to grips with the basics of the synthesis of these products and understand
the properties of these nitrogen containing compounds.

Download Questions Here:

Organic – Nitrogen based – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Organic – Nitrogen based – Explanations

Organic – Nitrogen based – Answers

Nuclear magnetic resonance gives information about the structure of molecules. At
A-level we learn about H 1 and C 13 NMR, and how we can use them to identify simple organic
molecules. For H 1 we deduce information about the structure by looking at the splitting
pattern, the chemical shift and the integration of each peak. Once you have done this you
should be able to assign the peaks to appropriate H environments and suggest a molecular
structure. For C 13 , we should only worry about the number of peaks and their induvial
chemical shifts. The combination of the two techniques should provide you with enough
information to assign simple organic molecules

Download Questions Here:

Organic – NMR – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Organic – NMR – Explanations

Organic – NMR – Answers

Chromatography is a technique used to separate different molecules based on their different properties and affiliation to certain phases. There are many different varieties of chromatography, which allows for separation based on many different properties and for many different purposes. At A-level we look at TLC, HPLC, column chromatography and gas chromatography. All four of these techniques work on the principle concept of a stationary and mobile phase.

Download Questions Here:

Organic – Chromatography – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Organic – Chromatography – Explanations

Organic – Chromatography – Answers

Mass Spectrometry

An analytical technique which yields a spectra of signal intensity of detected ions as a function of
mass-to-charge ratio (m/z). Molecules are ionised, and in doing this some fragment (the molecules
break up into smaller ions and radicals). The ions are separated based on their m/z, the
fragmentation of the molecule creates a unique pattern in the mass spectrum making it identifiable.
This technique is often coupled with gas chromatography, so that we can separate induvial
compounds and then individually identify them in the mass spectrometer.

Download Questions Here:

Organic – Mass Spectrometry – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Organic – Mass Spectrometry – Explanations

Organic – Mass Spectrometry – Answers

IR Spectroscopy 

IR spectroscopy is a relatively quick and easy technique, with a wide range of uses in organic and inorganic chemistry. It is readily used in forensic analysis, and one can be found in most police stations for the blood alcohol analysis of drunk drivers. A brief understanding of how they work and how to interpret their spectrums is required for this section.

Download Questions Here:

Organic – IR Spectroscopy – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Organic – IR spectroscopy – Explanations

Organic – IR Spectroscopy – Answers

We are able to apply our understanding of organic chemistry to the key molecules of life. Therefor in
this section we introduce proteins, enzymes and DNA looking at the chemical bonding and functional
groups that play a key role in their structures. Whilst also introducing the anti-cancer drug cisplatin,
which offers a clear demonstration of the specificity of biomolecules.

Download Questions Here:

Organic – AQA Biochem section – Questions

Download answers and explanations here:

Organic – Biochemistry – Explanations

Organic – Biochemistry – Answers